Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)


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The performance is given in an opera house, accompanied by an orchestra or smaller musical ensemble. Opera is a key part of the Western classical music tradition, in the 18th century, Italian opera continued to dominate most of Europe, attracting foreign composers such as George Frideric Handel.

Opera seria was the most prestigious form of Italian opera, until Christoph Willibald Gluck reacted against its artificiality with his operas in the s.

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The first third of the 19th century saw the point of the bel canto style, with Gioachino Rossini, Gaetano Donizetti. It also saw the advent of Grand Opera typified by the works of Auber and Meyerbeer, the mid-to-late 19th century was a golden age of opera, led and dominated by Richard Wagner in Germany and Giuseppe Verdi in Italy. The popularity of opera continued through the era in Italy and contemporary French opera through to Giacomo Puccini.

During the 19th century, parallel operatic traditions emerged in central and eastern Europe, the 20th century saw many experiments with modern styles, such as atonality and serialism, Neoclassicism, and Minimalism. With the rise of recording technology, singers such as Enrico Caruso, since the invention of radio and television, operas were also performed on these mediums.

Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from "Tancredi", Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)

Beginning in , a number of opera houses began to present live high-definition video transmissions of their performances in cinemas all over the world. In , an opera company offered a download of a complete performance. The words of an opera are known as the libretto, some composers, notably Wagner, have written their own libretti, others have worked in close collaboration with their librettists, e. Mozart with Lorenzo Da Ponte. Melodic or semi-melodic passages occurring in the midst of, or instead of, the terminology of the various kinds of operatic voices is described in detail below.

Over the 18th century, arias were accompanied by the orchestra. Subsequent composers have tended to follow Wagners example, though some, the changing role of the orchestra in opera is described in more detail below. Libretto — A libretto is the text used in, or intended for, an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, oratorio, cantata or musical. The term libretto is also used to refer to the text of major liturgical works, such as the Mass, requiem and sacred cantata.

Libretto, from Italian, is the diminutive of the word libro, sometimes other language equivalents are used for libretti in that language, livret for French works and Textbuch for German. A libretto is distinct from a synopsis or scenario of the plot, in that the libretto contains all the words and stage directions, while a synopsis summarizes the plot. The relationship of the librettist to the composer in the creation of a work has varied over the centuries, as have the sources. In the context of a modern English language musical theatre piece, Libretti for operas, oratorios and cantatas in the 17th and 18th centuries generally were written by someone other than the composer, often a well-known poet.

Metastasio was one of the most highly regarded librettists in Europe and his libretti were set many times by many different composers. Another noted 18th-century librettist was Lorenzo Da Ponte, who wrote the libretti for three of Mozarts greatest operas, as well as for other composers. Arrigo Boito, who wrote libretti for, among others, Giuseppe Verdi and Amilcare Ponchielli, the libretto is not always written before the music. Some composers wrote their own libretti, Richard Wagner is perhaps most famous in this regard, with his transformations of Germanic legends and events into epic subjects for his operas and music dramas.

In the case of musicals, the music, the lyrics, thus, a musical such as Fiddler on the Roof has a composer, a lyricist and the writer of the book. In rare cases, the composer writes everything except the dance arrangements - music, lyrics and libretto, Other matters in the process of developing a libretto parallel those of spoken dramas for stage or screen. The libretto of a musical, on the hand, is almost always written in prose. Venice — Venice is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region.

It is situated across a group of small islands that are separated by canals and these are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Parts of Venice are renowned for the beauty of their settings, their architecture, the lagoon and a part of the city are listed as a World Heritage Site. In ,, people resided in Comune di Venezia, together with Padua and Treviso, the city is included in the Padua-Treviso-Venice Metropolitan Area, with a total population of 2.

The name is derived from the ancient Veneti people who inhabited the region by the 10th century BC, the city was historically the capital of the Republic of Venice. The City State of Venice is considered to have been the first real international financial center which gradually emerged from the 9th century to its peak in the 14th century and this made Venice a wealthy city throughout most of its history.

It is also known for its several important artistic movements, especially the Renaissance period, Venice has played an important role in the history of symphonic and operatic music, and it is the birthplace of Antonio Vivaldi. Venice has been ranked the most beautiful city in the world as of , the name Venetia, however, derives from the Roman name for the people known as the Veneti, and called by the Greeks Eneti. The meaning of the word is uncertain, although there are other Indo-European tribes with similar-sounding names, such as the Celtic Veneti, Baltic Veneti, and the Slavic Wends.

The alternative obsolete form is Vinegia, some late Roman sources reveal the existence of fishermen on the islands in the original marshy lagoons. They were referred to as incolae lacunae, the traditional founding is identified with the dedication of the first church, that of San Giacomo on the islet of Rialto — said to have taken place at the stroke of noon on 25 March Beginning as early as AD to , the Quadi and Marcomanni destroyed the center in the area. The Roman defences were again overthrown in the early 5th century by the Visigoths and, some 50 years later, New ports were built, including those at Malamocco and Torcello in the Venetian lagoon.

The tribuni maiores, the earliest central standing governing committee of the islands in the Lagoon, the traditional first doge of Venice, Paolo Lucio Anafesto, was actually Exarch Paul, and his successor, Marcello Tegalliano, was Pauls magister militum. In the soldiers and citizens of the Exarchate rose in a rebellion over the controversy at the urging of Pope Gregory II. Neoclassicism — The main Neoclassical movement coincided with the 18th-century Age of Enlightenment, and continued into the early 19th century, laterally competing with Romanticism. In architecture, the style continued throughout the 19th, 20th, European Neoclassicism in the visual arts began c.

Each neo-classicism selects some models among the range of classics that are available to it. While the movement is described as the opposed counterpart of Romanticism. The case of the main champion of late Neoclassicism, Ingres, demonstrates this especially well. The revival can be traced to the establishment of formal archaeology, the writings of Johann Joachim Winckelmann were important in shaping this movement in both architecture and the visual arts. With the advent of the Grand Tour, a fad of collecting antiquities began that laid the foundations of many great collections spreading a Neoclassical revival throughout Europe, Neoclassicism in each art implies a particular canon of a classical model.

In English, the term Neoclassicism is used primarily of the arts, the similar movement in English literature. This, which had been dominant for decades, was beginning to decline by the time Neoclassicism in the visual arts became fashionable. Though terms differ, the situation in French literature was similar, in music, the period saw the rise of classical music, and Neoclassicism is used of 20th-century developments.

Ingress coronation portrait of Napoleon even borrowed from Late Antique consular diptychs and their Carolingian revival, much Neoclassical painting is more classicizing in subject matter than in anything else. A fierce, but often very badly informed, dispute raged for decades over the merits of Greek and Roman art, with Winckelmann. The work of artists, who could not easily be described as insipid, combined aspects of Romanticism with a generally Neoclassical style. Unlike Carstens unrealized schemes, the etchings of Giovanni Battista Piranesi were numerous and profitable and his main subject matter was the buildings and ruins of Rome, and he was more stimulated by the ancient than the modern.

Neoclassicism in painting gained a new sense of direction with the success of Jacques-Louis Davids Oath of the Horatii at the Paris Salon of Despite its evocation of republican virtues, this was a commission by the royal government, David managed to combine an idealist style with drama and forcefulness. David rapidly became the leader of French art, and after the French Revolution became a politician with control of government patronage in art.

Romanticism — Romanticism was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical. It was embodied most strongly in the arts, music, and literature, but had a major impact on historiography, education. It elevated folk art and ancient custom to something noble, Romanticism assigned a high value to the achievements of heroic individualists and artists, whose examples, it maintained, would raise the quality of society.

It also promoted the individual imagination as a critical authority allowed of freedom from classical notions of form in art, there was a strong recourse to historical and natural inevitability, a Zeitgeist, in the representation of its ideas. In the second half of the 19th century, Realism was offered as a polar opposite to Romanticism, the decline of Romanticism during this time was associated with multiple processes, including social and political changes and the spread of nationalism. Defining the nature of Romanticism may be approached from the point of the primary importance of the free expression of the feelings of the artist.

The importance the Romantics placed on emotion is summed up in the remark of the German painter Caspar David Friedrich that the feeling is his law. Samuel Taylor Coleridge and others believed there were laws that the imagination—at least of a good creative artist—would unconsciously follow through artistic inspiration if left alone. As well as rules, the influence of models from other works was considered to impede the creators own imagination, so that originality was essential. The concept of the genius, or artist who was able to produce his own work through this process of creation from nothingness, is key to Romanticism.

This idea is called romantic originality. Not essential to Romanticism, but so widespread as to be normative, was a strong belief, however, this is particularly in the effect of nature upon the artist when he is surrounded by it, preferably alone. Romantic art addressed its audiences with what was intended to be felt as the voice of the artist.

So, in literature, much of romantic poetry invited the reader to identify the protagonists with the poets themselves. In both French and German the closeness of the adjective to roman, meaning the new literary form of the novel, had some effect on the sense of the word in those languages. It is only from the s that Romanticism certainly knew itself by its name, the period typically called Romantic varies greatly between different countries and different artistic media or areas of thought.

Margaret Drabble described it in literature as taking place roughly between and , and few dates much earlier than will be found. In English literature, M. Abrams placed it between , or , this latter a very typical view, and about , however, in most fields the Romantic Period is said to be over by about , or earlier. It is situated 50 kilometres north-northeast of Bologna, on the Po di Volano, the town has broad streets and numerous palaces dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, when it hosted the court of the House of Este.

Modern times have brought a renewal of industrial activity, Ferrara is on the main rail line from Bologna to Padua and Venice, and has branches to Ravenna, Poggio Rusco and Codigoro. Obizzo II dEste was proclaimed ruler of Ferrara five hundred years later. He also became seignior of nearby Modena in and of Reggio in , in the Este rulers were created Dukes of Modena and Reggio, and in Ferrara also became a duchy. Ferrara remained a part of the Papal States from to , with an interruption during the Napoleonic period, in it became part of the Kingdom of Italy. A fortress was constructed by Pope Paul V on the site of the castle called Castel Tedaldo, at the south-west angle of the town, all of the fortress was dismantled following the birth of the Kingdom of Italy and the bricks used for new constructions all over the town.

On August 23,, the Ferrara synthetic rubber plant was a target of Strategic bombing during World War II, the town is still surrounded by more than 9 kilometres of ancient walls, mainly built in the 15th and 16th-centuries. Along with those of Lucca, they are the best preserved Renaissance walls in Italy, the imposing brick Castello Estense sited in the very centre of the town is iconic of Ferrara.

The castle, erected in , is surrounded by a moat, the pavilions on the top of the towers date from the 16th-century refurbishment. The City Hall, renovated in the 18th century, was the residence of the Este family. The sculpture of the portal was signed by a Nicholaus. An elaborate 13th-century relief depicting the Last Judgement is found in the story of the porch. It holds top-ten positions in national and international rankings and measures.

The university currently enrolls approximately 5, students in the College, Chicagos physics department helped develop the worlds first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction beneath the viewing stands of universitys Stagg Field.

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The university is home to the University of Chicago Press. With an estimated date of , the Barack Obama Presidential Center will be housed at the university. Both Harper and future president Robert Maynard Hutchins advocated for Chicagos curriculum to be based upon theoretical and perennial issues rather than on applied sciences, the University of Chicago has many prominent alumni.

Sheet music Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from "Tancredi", Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)

Rockefeller on land donated by Marshall Field, while the Rockefeller donation provided money for academic operations and long-term endowment, it was stipulated that such money could not be used for buildings. Organized as an independent institution legally, it replaced the first Baptist university of the same name, william Rainey Harper became the modern universitys first president on July 1,, and the university opened for classes on October 1, The business school was founded thereafter in , and the law school was founded in , Harper died in , and was replaced by a succession of three presidents whose tenures lasted until During this period, the Oriental Institute was founded to support, in , the university affiliated with Shimer College in Mount Carroll, Illinois.

The agreement provided that either party could terminate the affiliation on proper notice, several University of Chicago professors disliked the program, as it involved uncompensated additional labor on their part, and they believed it cheapened the academic reputation of the university.

The program passed into history by , in , the universitys fifth president, Robert Maynard Hutchins, took office, the university underwent many changes during his year tenure. In , Hutchins proposed a plan to merge the University of Chicago. During his term, the University of Chicago Hospitals finished construction, also, the Committee on Social Thought, an institution distinctive of the university, was created.

Money that had been raised during the s and financial backing from the Rockefeller Foundation helped the school to survive through the Great Depression, during World War II, the university made important contributions to the Manhattan Project. The university was the site of the first isolation of plutonium and of the creation of the first artificial, in the early s, student applications declined as a result of increasing crime and poverty in the Hyde Park neighborhood.

The present building was designed by Charles J. Phipps and was constructed in for actor-manager Herbert Beerbohm Tree, M. Since the First World War, the stage has made the theatre suitable for large-scale musical productions. The theatre was established by architect and playwright John Vanbrugh, in , legitimate drama unaccompanied by music was prohibited by law in all but the two London patent theatres, and so this theatre quickly became an opera house.

Between and , more than 25 operas by George Frideric Handel premiered here and it also hosted the Ballet of her Majestys Theatre in the midth century, before returning to hosting the London premieres of such operas as Bizets Carmen and Wagners Ring Cycle. The name of the changes with the sex of the monarch. Really Useful Theatres has owned the building since , the land beneath it is on a long-term lease from the Crown Estate.

In the new business, he hoped to improve the share of profits that would go to playwrights, —John Vanbrughs notice of subscription for the new theatre He was joined in the enterprise by his principal associate and manager William Congreve and an actors co-operative led by Thomas Betterton.

The theatre provided the first alternative to the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, built in , the theatres site is the second oldest such site in London that remains in use. These three post-interregnum theatres defined the shape and use of modern theatres, the land for the theatre was held on a lease renewable in and was ultimately owned, as it is today, by the Crown Estate. Building was delayed by the necessity of acquiring the street frontage, colley Cibber described the audience fittings as lavish but the facilities for playing poor. This was the first Italian opera performed in London, the opera failed, and the season struggled on through May, with revivals of plays and operas.

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The first new play performed was The Conquest of Spain by Mary Pix, the theatre proved too large for actors voices to carry across the auditorium, and the first season was a failure. Congreve departed, Vanbrugh bought out his partners, and the actors reopened the Lincolns Inn Fields theatre in the summer. On 7 May , experiencing mounting losses and running costs, after , the theatre was devoted to Italian opera and was sometimes known informally as the Haymarket Opera House.

Wiki as never seen before with video and photo galleries, discover something new today. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Tancredi disambiguation. Keith Anderson , " Tancredi ", in booklet accompanying the Naxos recording, p. Tancredi" — via Amazon.

Messa di Gloria Stabat mater , Petite messe solennelle , The Barber of Seville William Tell. The Barber of Seville film. Rossini biographical film Rossini! Conservatorio Statale di Musica "Gioachino Rossini". Retrieved from " https: In , he appeared at the theatre of the Commune in Ferdinando Paers Camilla and he was also a capable horn player, treading in the footsteps of his father 2. He campaigned to eradicate priestly and aristo-monarchical authority, and supported a constitutional monarchy that protects peoples rights, the author adopted the name Voltaire in , following his incarceration at the Bastille 3.

On 29 January , La Fenice was completely destroyed by fire, only its acoustics were preserved, since Lamberto Tronchin, an Italian acoustician, had measured the acoustics two months earlier 4. Subsequent composers have tended to follow Wagners example, though some, the changing role of the orchestra in opera is described in more detail below 5. The libretto of a musical, on the hand, is almost always written in prose 6. In the soldiers and citizens of the Exarchate rose in a rebellion over the controversy at the urging of Pope Gregory II 7.

David rapidly became the leader of French art, and after the French Revolution became a politician with control of government patronage in art 8. Abrams placed it between , or , this latter a very typical view, and about , however, in most fields the Romantic Period is said to be over by about , or earlier 9. An elaborate 13th-century relief depicting the Last Judgement is found in the story of the porch The university was the site of the first isolation of plutonium and of the creation of the first artificial, in the early s, student applications declined as a result of increasing crime and poverty in the Hyde Park neighborhood YouTube Videos [show more].

Pastel by Maurice Quentin de La Tour , Performers from the Atlanta Opera sing the finale of Lucia di Lammermoor. The opera orchestra is visible in the lowered area in front of the stage. Pages from an libretto for Ernani , with the original Italian lyrics, English translation and musical notation for one of the arias. Henry Purcell — whose operas were written to English libretti. A collage of Venice: Venice in spring, with the Rialto Bridge in the background.


  • Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from "Tancredi", Act 2, Scene 17 (Voca;
  • Living Free from Sin, Volume 1.
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View of San Marco basin in Henry Fuseli , The artist moved to despair at the grandeur of antique fragments, — Anton Raphael Mengs , Judgement of Paris , c. Print of a drawing by John Flaxman of a scene in Homer 's Iliad , Philipp Otto Runge , The Morning, An early convocation ceremony at the University of Chicago. View from the Midway Plaisance. Many older buildings of the University of Chicago employ Collegiate Gothic architecture like that of the University of Oxford.

Exterior of Her Majesty's Theatre, Sir John Vanbrugh painted by Godfrey Kneller. Jacob of the painting by Watteau. Giuditta Pasta as Amina, May premiere. Pasta in by Gioacchino Giuseppe Serangeli. A nineteenth-century depiction of the Teatro alla Scala. The theatre and surrounding neighborhood c. Architectural rendering of the Park Theatre.

The design had to be abandoned during construction due to budget constraints. Philip Gossett's research in states that "until about the musical text was rather fluid. The first Ricordi edition , which differs significantly from the later ones, corresponds to the Milanese version.

After an revival at the Teatro Comunale di Bologna, Tancredi was not mounted again until almost years later. With the discovery of the long-lost music for the March Ferrara revision and the resulting preparation and completion of the critical edition, the work was revived when mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne , who had expressed interest as early as in performing the Ferrara edition if it ever came to light [19] took on the title role at the Houston Grand Opera on 13 October Horne, who quickly became strongly associated with that role, insisted on the tragic Ferrara ending, citing that it is more consistent with the overall tone of the opera and that she "did not find the happy ending convincing".

Horne's triumphant performances as Tancredi in Houston soon led to invitations from other opera houses to sing the role, and it is largely through her efforts that the opera enjoyed a surge of revivals during the latter half of the 20th century. She also recorded the role in Pier Luigi Pizzi staged a new production of Tancredi for the Rossini Opera Festival in Pesaro in [20] which originally utilised both the tragic and happy endings — the former being interpolated as a "dream sequence" for Amenaide. He also designed both costumes and scenery. The production was also revived at Pesaro in , , and The second production in Poland took place in Warsaw Chamber Opera in Barcellona sang Tancredi again in a new staging of the opera at the Teatro Regio di Torino in November after reprising the part in February at the Teatro de la Maestranza.

In addition, as part of its Rossini revivals series, it presented a fully staged production in May with Marie-Nicole Lemieux in the title role and Patrizia Ciofi as Amenaide. The production used the "unhappy" Ferrara ending, but incorporated many of the changes and reversions found in the December version for Milan. In Teatro Nuovo presented alternating performances of the original Venetian score including the portions that have been replaced in most modern productions and a version they called Tancredi rifatto , incorporating every known substitute piece by Rossini including the aria written to replace "Di tanti palpiti".

There is both conflict and war between the Byzantine empire with which it has an unstable truce and the Saracen armies headed by Solamir, but exhausted by external war, there are internal conflicts as well. The soldier Tancredi and his family have been stripped of their estates and inheritances, and he himself has been banished since his youth. Two noble families, headed by Argirio and Orbazzano, have been warring for years and they begin to reconcile. Also present is Solamir, the Moorish general. Argirio's daughter, Amenaide, is secretly in love with Tancredi.

Prior to the beginning of the opera, she has sent him a letter without naming him in it , and it is this letter which complicates the proceedings which follow. Warring nobles Argirio, leader of the Senate in Syracuse, and Orbazzano and their men celebrate a truce and the end of a civil war: Along with Isaura and her ladies, Argirio proclaims that this unity reinforces a new security for the city against the Moorish forces led by Solamir: He names Orbazzano as the leader against the Moors. However, Argirio warns the assembled forces against a possible greater threat, that from the banished Tancredi, a statement which disturbs Isaura.

Argirio then summons his daughter, Amenaide to appear. She joins in the general songs of triumph which are expressed by the assembly, but is also disturbed by the fact that her secret beloved, Tancredi, has not rejoined her in spite of the fact that she has written a letter to him asking him to do so now that he is returning in disguise to Syracuse.

The Senate, having already given Tancredi and his family's confiscated estates to Orbazzano, Argirio then offers Amenaide in marriage to him in order to help solidify the truce. He wishes to have the ceremony performed immediately, and although she dutifully consents to the arrangement, she pleads with her father to postpone it until the following day. All leave except Isaura who laments upon the situation in which Amenaide is now placed: The garden is close to the seashore. Roggiero, then Tancredi and his men, disembark from a ship.

Not having received Amenaide's letter, he pledges to help defend the city against the invaders and to seek out his beloved: Roggiero is dispatched with a message for Amenaide, and he sends his followers to spread the word that an unknown knight has arrived to help save the city. His thoughts turn to Amenaide: When all have left, Tancredi sees Argirio and his daughter enter the garden. He hides, but can overhear their conversation. Argirio informs Amenaide and the followers who accompany them that all are invited to the wedding which will take place at noon. The young woman pleads for more time, but is told that the ceremony must take place right away.

Argirio continues by informing all that the enemy leader, Solamir, has surrounded the city, and has asked for Amenaide's hand in marriage. Orbazzano then states that he will lead the people of Syracuse against the enemy, the recent action of the Senate having condemned to death all traitors.

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As Argirio leaves, Amenaide immediately regrets that she has indirectly involved Tancredi by writing to him: Tancredi then appears and Amenaide tells him that he must immediately escape. Coldly, she rejects his claims of loving her, although the couple, in spite of their differences, then laments the dangerous situation in which they find themselves: People are gathered in the square for the wedding ceremony.

Argirio assures all that the new-found unity between the two factions will be strengthened by the marriage. In disguise, Tancredi appears and offers his services. Privately, he feels that Amenaide has betrayed him by accepting the marriage but, when she refuses to go ahead with it, an angry Orbazzano enters. Publicly, he denounces her and, having overheard the prior conversation, declares that the marriage will not take place.

Immediately, he produces a letter, which he assumes was intended for Solamir and which appears to implicate her in a treasonous plot to overthrow Syracuse by calling upon the recipient to come and capture the city. The assembled crowd is horrified: Amenaide swears that she is innocent, but her father denounces her, as does Tancredi.

She is dragged off to prison to await death as all except her faithful Isaura proclaim: Quale infausto orrendo giorno! An angry Orbazzano reflects on Amenaide's apparent treachery and her contempt of him: She spurns me, the unworthy woman". Aside, Isaura pities Amenaide's fate, reminding Argirio that Amenaide is his own daughter: The assembled knights are divided in their emotions, and while Argirio expresses his sorrow at the turn of events, Aria: All but Isaura and Orbazzano leave.

She reproaches him for his cruelty and barbarous behaviour, and, then alone after he leaves, she pleads for divine aid for Amenaide: In chains, Amenaide enters: She cries out to Tancredi "I die for you! In the end, she believes that he will learn the truth and "he will know the constancy of my heart". Into the prison come Orbazzano and his followers, determined to see the execution carried out. But he asks if there is anyone willing to defend the traitor.

Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)
Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)
Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)
Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)
Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)
Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)
Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)
Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score) Perchè turbar la calma: No. 31 from Tancredi, Act 2, Scene 17 (Vocal Score)

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