The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley


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While salespeople are motivated by money, they have to have a product which they can sell. They do not necessarily have to believe in the product, they just have to believe they can sell it.

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The Nudist on the Late Shift: And Other True Tales of Silicon Valley

Salespeople should listen more and talk less in order for the client to tell them exactly what he needs. If a tech company is a publicly traded company then they have to continue selling stuff per quarter. Each quarter should outgrow the previous quarter's quota in sales which target's are set by Wall Street analysts. Sales people only sell to companies who use their products.

In technology, buyers decide the price. According to Bronson, the hardest part of sales is to abruptly say goodbye so the customer will not have time for buyers remorse. Gilder was a guy who says sensational things to get media coverage so he would get his point across.

He believes in supply-side economics and that today's problems will change by tomorrow's entrepreneurial engineering.

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He believes in the libertarian motive of how the Internet will disrupt Hollywood and the music industries. George was correct in his guess that the Internet would replace the baby bells with ISP and his theory that the Internet would make personal computers obsolete in favor of smart phones and tablets. In the Information Age, whomever can manipulate information the fastest will lead the future of the world.

CEO s love to debate because it is only through debating that they keep their thoughts sharp. He wants companies to think about the long term implications of what they do. Danny's history suggests that he trouble shoots in resource poor places in order to maximizes things that work. Everyone in Silicon Valley is attempting to make things that have not existed before.

Bronson believes that to create and risk failing is the essence of feeling alive. In Silicon Valley, having money is a sign of respect. But because there is a lot of money floating around, they do not care about where the money goes so they allow needless spending all over the place.

In the era of Internet expansion, talent is the limiting factor for rapid expansion. People want to work for a company that will succeed not just some company that will make money but tank in a few years. Silicon Valley personnel believe in competition in order to motivate their workers to create value in society via libertarian point of view in motivating their workers toward self-interest the allocation of resources would be maximize which ultimately benefits society and workaholic viewpoint in that anything worth doing is hard.


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Although Silicon Valley financiers have inside knowledge on how things should run, their knowledge ideally should be kept open to all. So in a way, insider trading occurs in Silicon Valley circles more than traditional circles. Although there is no such thing as company loyalty in the US since the advent of multinational firms laying off people, the Silicon Valley industry people are generally loyal to the industry but not necessarily a specific company.

Silicon Valley entrepreneurs tend to think in the short term instead of the long-term effects of their products or their creation of their companies. Silicon Valley employees are motivated by the chance to revolutionize the world via technology and stock options.

The Silicon Valley entrepreneur culture is to spread ones interest to different companies so if one goes down then it is no big deal as well as spreading the risk. People in the valley are motivated by totally changing the world through technology. He states that the key to success is to find away to make a difference and everything will follow from personal success to promotions to financial gain.

The tech culture influences other valley non-tech businesses in that the thought process becomes one of not if we can do it but how we are to accomplish the " impossible". Networking Status in Silicon Valley has to do with scarcity so it has to do with what is done right now not what what is done down the line. Thus, status is given to a company that has done the most with the least amount of resources. The new economy rewards those entrepreneurs who listen to the untapped demand of its users.

He has faith the Information Age will create added value into people's lives and inject income into the economy. Jul 21, Sandy rated it did not like it Shelves: I thought this book would be more interesting than it was. It follows some unusual stories about techees in the corporate world.

Who cares if a guy likes to work naked in a corporate office when no one is there.

It may have been just me but I would have been more interested in it if there wasn't the presumption that techees don't do stupid things that normal people do. I also found the writing style to be more critical of its subject than I cared for. Almost like he was making fun of them and no I thought this book would be more interesting than it was.


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Almost like he was making fun of them and not in a nice way. Feb 15, Peter Aronson rated it liked it. Reading this in makes it a bit of a period piece -- there's no mention, for instance, of Google Eric Schmidt is mentioned, but as the CEO of Novell , which is a bit of a sign of the changes that have happened in the Valley since then. This book provides an interesting overview of the culture of Silicon Valley in , but I don't thing Bronson really got engineers or programmers but the chapter on Danny Hillis was rather interesting , which kind of limits the understanding you can ge Reading this in makes it a bit of a period piece -- there's no mention, for instance, of Google Eric Schmidt is mentioned, but as the CEO of Novell , which is a bit of a sign of the changes that have happened in the Valley since then.

This book provides an interesting overview of the culture of Silicon Valley in , but I don't thing Bronson really got engineers or programmers but the chapter on Danny Hillis was rather interesting , which kind of limits the understanding you can get of the culture from him. Nov 28, Nicholas Moryl rated it liked it. Really captures the zeitgeist of the '99 bubble.

Still interesting reading for Silicon Valley entrepreneurs today. Focuses a lot on the hustle aspect of building a startup, but I think that's often underestimated. Startups are tough and it's not easy being a founder. The book doesn't gloss over failure stories, and it's important to keep in mind that's statistically speaking how most startups end.

Nov 18, 'stina rated it really liked it. I read that book in late , right at the end of the dot. The book went into the culture and atmosphere of Silicon Valley, how weird it was, how exciting it was, how people came to find their fortunes, how money was thrown around like no tomorrow. It was fascinating, and around that time, my boss and I were working on a dot. Jul 14, Scott rated it really liked it.

You might not learn a massive amount of business know-how, but it's got some good stories on just how manic life can get in start-ups, and how unique some of the people working in them can be Plus you can easily read a chapter, then leave it for however long and come back to it later. Feb 17, Michael rated it it was ok Shelves: This book was OK. It was surprisingly dated in it's spproach. That is, it seemed to be a snapshot of Silicon Valley between , and while that is partially interesting for the stories of Sabeer Bhatia, Jack Smith, and Ben Chiu it doesn't really speak to universals like masterpieces "Soul of a New Machine", "Cuckoo's Egg", and "Fire in the Valley".

Worth a weekend read however. Sep 22, Kelsey rated it really liked it. I loved the author's writing style; it reminds me of Stephen Ambrose. He tells other people's experiences and links them together to illustrate the boom and plunge of the. This is not the typical book I would have read, but it furthered my theory that real life is more interesting than fiction.

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Mar 22, Carl rated it really liked it. Although this is a little bit dated, this collection of disparate stories has some very interesting and telling tales of the odd and confused life of people in venture capital fueled software development. The section on sales is one of the best descriptions of the motivations of high tech sales people I have ever read. Some may think these days are over; I can tell you there not. Apr 28, Tonydowler Dowler rated it liked it. This book was WAY cooler in the mid's, when working in a tech firm was still the coolest thing you could be doing in America.

Nevertheless, it's still an insightful read. Po Bronson has a good head on his shoulders, and his writing is as relevant in bust today as it was back then. I really need to find out what he's up to now. Jul 07, Jennifer rated it liked it. Fascinating, though scattershot, collection of interviews from the dot com ground zero around the turn of this century.

You get a real sense of the youth and energy and optimism of the people who came to Silicon Valley. Most seem sincere and almost idealistic. A few are self absorbed and callow but only. George Gilder comes across as a twat. Really, the name was the most clever thing about this book. The author would bring up an interesting subject - a dot. Good hook, no backup.

Oct 21, Ben rated it liked it. I remember liking this book when I read it. I liked the story about the software salesperson trying to sell software they know is inferior. I liked the story about the guy who came up with the idea about hotmail. May 09, Anne rated it liked it.

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Bronson started out swiftly but the book runs out of steam about two-thirds of the way through. Over ten years old now but the book still paints a picture of the go-go times in the late s when customer acquisition was the driving force and profits were ignored. We all know what happened. Feb 10, Shala Howell rated it it was ok. Read this years ago on a recommendation from my editor. Seemed dated even then, but maybe that's because my dotcom experience took place in TX and MA, not Silicon Valley itself.

Overall though, I remember thinking that the book was all title and no point. Apr 30, dipayan rated it really liked it. Oct 02, Godwin Schembri rated it liked it. This makes a very interesting read if you remember the times in Silicon Valley just before the bubble. It is now very dated but I still enjoyed reading it as I identified a number of huge names back then that are now defunct.

Jul 29, Ning rated it really liked it. In the high-tech realm, cutting edge won't do. Rather, innovation must run deep. It must draw blood. The tour opens in San Jose and ends in Austin. Some 35 miles south of San Francisco sprawls an unremarkable expanse of low-slung buildings known as the Silicon Valley. It is the setting for an enclave of fertile minds dreaming up hardware and software for computers, fueling the burgeoning Internet, and invoking a synergy of creative spunk. It is also the backdrop for three new nonfiction books about Silicon Valley culture, high-tech competition, and the egomaniacal push to get ahead.

And Other True Tales of Silicon Valley , amuses with its physical descriptions and mesmerizes with its rendition of the technical mind. The mountainous edges of the Silicon Valley, writes Bronson, rise up like the lip of a great big copper-bottomed frying pan of overpriced Revere Ware, and on the high heat of burning money everything and everyone in there melts into a boiling, spattering, frenetic stew. But what a stew! This is no amorphous clique of techno-nerds. It's a delectable blend of brainiacs, visionaries, and market-savvy moguls whom Bronson illustrates with color and verve.

And what of the nudist in the title? Local legend has it that a programmer on the late shift of a Valley animation company misread his office clock and, believing it was after 10 p. When he wandered down a hallway, members of the day crew were still hanging out and called security guards, who asked him to get dressed.

Bronson tracked down the rumored nudist none other than David Coons, inventor of one of the first film-to-digital scanners, and anointed him the ultimate symbol of how Valley workers inject their personal values into the job. There was something innocent about his nakedness, writes Bronson, adding that the image was one of no distractions. Just a man, a computer, and a job. While Silicon Valley set the tone for high-tech culture, America Online set the pace for dominance in the online industry. Kara Swisher charts the potholes on the road to success with aol. The book reveals battles for control of AOL, including a heavy-handed bid by Microsoft.

It details the difficult online outages, user access crises, and debates over cyberporn and censorship. It also unveils prescient decisions about the growth of the online industry and some shrewd affiliations including one with the fledgling Motley Fool, an investor site that would become wildly successful in its own right.

The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley
The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley
The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley
The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley
The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley
The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley
The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley The Nudist On The Lateshift: and Other Tales of Silicon Valley

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