Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated)


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This single book tore down in two weeks the walls of superstition that Adventism built in my mind for over 5 years. That should say something. This read is not only stunning in intellectual depth, but very funny at parts too as Luther uses the aid of metaphors, similes, and even the abuses of the Catholic church itself to prove Scripture.

And of course he backs up Scripture with more Scripture, line upon line, here a little, there a little. Even if you feel well versed in righteousness by faith, please read this book; I highly doubt it will fail to solidify your faith in Christ and Christ alone. May 28, Henry rated it it was amazing. Luther regarded this work as among his best. It dealt with the central issues of the Reformation in a clear and decisive way. If you want to know what the Reformation was about, read this book. John Bunyan said of it that there was no book apart from the Bible better suited to help a wounded conscience.

It was a favorite of his and deserves to be more widely read today. Oct 17, John Lowery rated it it was amazing. This is the book that God used to bring me to assurance. It is truly wonderful and should be widely read. Jul 11, Zoie Thune rated it it was amazing. This commentary refreshed my understanding of the gospel and my joy in the gospel.

Read this commentary if you want to distinguish between the law and gospel, have Christ set before your eyes, encourage a guilty conscience, or learn how to speak the gospel to yourself and others. Possibly you just want to see Luther smack talk the papacy. I would recommend it to any brother or sister in Christ but especially to those who are battling a guilty conscience. For example, "To be dead to the Law means This commentary refreshed my understanding of the gospel and my joy in the gospel.

For example, "To be dead to the Law means to be free of the Law. What right, then, has the Law to accuse me, or to hold anything against me? When you see a person squirming in the clutches of the Law, say to him: You let the Law talk to your conscience. Make it talk to your flesh. Wake up, and believe in Jesus Christ, the Conqueror of Law and sin.

Faith in Christ will lift you high above the Law into the heaven of grace. Though Law and sin remain, they no longer concern you, because you are dead to the Law and dead to sin. After reading the Bible, every Christian should at least one time in their life read something by Martin Luther to understand the man who has been responsible for the Protestant Reformation and the issue of justification that was at stake.

Luther's commentary of Galatians was a delightful read. I was surprised that there was not a strong polemical taste to this work but instead one feels the pastoral heartbeat of Luther as he expounds the meaning of the text and often showing how a promise in Ga After reading the Bible, every Christian should at least one time in their life read something by Martin Luther to understand the man who has been responsible for the Protestant Reformation and the issue of justification that was at stake.

I was surprised that there was not a strong polemical taste to this work but instead one feels the pastoral heartbeat of Luther as he expounds the meaning of the text and often showing how a promise in Galatians should be applied to combating wrong thoughts and demonic discouragement.

Again, a delightful read, but more than reading the words of Martin Luther this commentary made me read more carefully on my own the book of Galatians itself. Oct 24, Brian rated it it was amazing Shelves: May 28, Jay Risner rated it liked it. Jun 06, Brendan rated it it was amazing. His works overflow with a sense of Christ's grace. I trust he had a decent understanding of the text, Graebner has this odd desire to make Luther 'talk American' so throws random 's American slang into a work written by a sixteenth-century German. It's awful distracting to hear Luther talking about 'dollars'.

While Luther is not as precise as Calvin, and sometimes even stretches exegesis to the breaking point, his grasp of the gospel of free grace makes the commentary well worth consulting. Historically, this is one of the most important commentaries ever written. It embodies the reformation teaching of justification by faith alone. Galatians was Luther's favorite epistle, and his commentary on Galatians was his favorite among his own writings.

It's also just as vibrant and insightful today as it was when Luther wrote it. May 26, Douglas Wilson rated it liked it Shelves: Fascinating read in light of the role Luther played launching the Protestant Reformation. You don't pick up this book expecting a nail-biting page-turner, so as a "good" read I might give it two stars. For content, its contribution to my faith and understanding, I could give it four. So I merge the two and give it three. Stars don't suit the purpose with this book, though. In my old age I'm reading a shelf full of books -- a Kindle full a well -- catching up on what I've missed through decades of lending my mind to someone else a career in corporate management.

My mind returned to You don't pick up this book expecting a nail-biting page-turner, so as a "good" read I might give it two stars. My mind returned to me from its captivity, though, weary but intact. And now I am cleansing it with the books that my soul craves.

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Overview - Martin Luther's Commentary on Galatians

I had always wanted to know what Luther was all about, and I am glad I finally acted on that wish. That did not persuade me toward joining the RC church, nor does the Commentary on Galatians draw me into the Lutheran Church. I'm already a confirmed but disappointed Episcopalian. The church of the early, early Christians, and more precisely, the humble faith of the early, early Christians is what persuades me. Martin Luther enlivens Paul in this Commentary.

Galatians 4:18-31 - Martin Luther's Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians

I have no doubt that, among all living people in Judea at the time of Paul's conversion, Paul himself was the most eloquent, persuasive, energetic, and dedicated voice that Jesus could have conscripted to speak for him after the Resurrection. But Paul was devoted to destroying Jesus's influence. Once he was forced to listen, though, and once he heard the haunting words, Why are you persecuting me? He is utterly alive and compelling in his own words through the Epistles and as spoken of in the Acts.

Compelling, but also theologically consistent. Martin Luther grasped all of this. And Luther expertly dissected the Epistle to the Galatians to effectively illuminate Paul's separation of the Law from faith. It struck me that early in the Epistle, and in the Commentary as well, the Law seemed almost explicitly to refer only to the Ten Commandments of Moses. At one point I felt that this conclusion was confirmed. But later, Luther expands the definition meaning that Paul is understood to have done so also to include all of the Law of Moses with its rites, rules, and rituals.

I thought Luther might comment on the Ten Commandments as a body of law that is worthy unto itself. He also only weakly and slowly confirmed that the Law in its broad sense represents what one might follow voluntarily once one has grasped that righteousness comes by faith. For all the law, written to manage our behavior in all matters and all human intercourse, boils down to one commandment: Love your neighbor as yourself. And you can do that as intended only once you love God, and you can love God only by faith. It is interesting, in my studies of these and other volumes I have consumed, that the path to Grace is very, very straight and the understanding needed is very, very elementary.

Throughout his ministry Paul struggled not to make something that is inherently complicated plain to the masses -- for it is not inherently complicated. He struggled to keep something that is inherently simple visible to the masses and to strip it of all the complication that was being built up around it.

Faith is a leap. Works, done according to the Law, do not build a bridge across anything that must be crossed by faith alone. After this, I expect to read more of Luther.

Commentary on Galatians

And after that I have a lot more to read by C. I now see the humanity of Martin Luther and agree that he was a passionate, effective apostle for Jesus. Luther gets a bum rap. They accuse him of not presenting the whole truth. As if he taught that the Christian had no responsibility or incentive to live in a way that would adorn the gospel. That the message on justification condoned lawlessness. Obviously, those people have not read his works.

It is what Paul focused on in Luther gets a bum rap. It is what Paul focused on in his epistle to the Galatians and other writings. Justification is a gift, bought by the righteous life and blood of Christ, not ours. This is not what the papacy in his day was teaching. It is not that Luther condoned lawlessness. We know that we must also teach good works, but they must be taught in the proper turn, when the discussion is concerning works and not the article of justification Not that we reject good works. But we will not allow ourselves to be removed from the anchorage of our salvation.

We do not say that the law is bad. Only it is not able to justify us. I was pleasantly surprised. My 4 star rating was based on the translation, not the content. Mar 04, Tim Casteel rated it it was amazing. So much wisdom in this book - and surprisingly easy to read. Great book to slowly read through in morning devotions.

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I read it in tandem with Tim Keller's commentary on Galatians. They make a great pairing - they're very different and excellent in their own ways. It was Luther himself's favorite book he authored which is saying a lot - including his lectures, he has over works; This is a crazy stat: It presents like no other of Luther's writings the central thought of Christianity, the justification of the sinner for the sake of Christ's merits alone.

Definitely a book I will re-read often. Nov 26, Rex Libris rated it it was amazing. A great explication of the Gospel message, and the notion of justification by Faith alone; as opposed to justification by the law or good works. The setting of the letter is a rebuke to the church in Galatia. Paul founded the churches there, and preached the Gospel message of justification by Faith alone. After he left, some other so-called teachers came along and started to get many of the Galatians to believe in justification by the law.

Paul wrote the letter to set them back on the right trac A great explication of the Gospel message, and the notion of justification by Faith alone; as opposed to justification by the law or good works. Paul wrote the letter to set them back on the right track.


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He explains how the law cannot save, only faith in Jesus Christ. He goes on to explain to explain the purpose of the law is to show one his or her sinful natures, and thus the need for Jesus as Savior. Good works are not to be entirely jettisoned, as performing good works should be a response to grace, as way of showing appreciation for the grace. However, as no one can live a life of only good works, and no one can adhere perfectly to the law, it cannot save.

It was so great to get a glimpse into the mind and heart of a man hell-bent on being faithful to the gospel. While Luther's commentary is saturated with his crusade against the pope, it is clear that Luther's resolve was fueled by Paul's own resolve to fight the Judaizers. Justification by faith in Christ alone is the resounding theme, and Luther absolutely will not stand for another gospel, for there is no other.

To be sure, one must wade through this polemic which was certainly necessary, particularly for his time - he was the Esther of his day to find the nuggets of gold, but Luther's treatment of justification and the use of the law is worth it. I love how Luther is pouring his heart out in this commentary and how he is looking to the time he was living in through Scripture.

I highly recommend this work to every Christian, every Bible student especially those who wants to know what is the role of the law to the Christian. Nov 04, David Pulliam rated it it was amazing. I readable book even in our day and age. Luther does a great job of guiding you through a mediations dn explanation of the text, he is insightful but not does not get into too much detail.

Worth the time to read, years has made it even better. Luther excavates his favorite topic, Justification by Faith Alone, in every verse of his favorite book. A good commentary, especially for understanding the essential theology of a man who changed the world.

May 23, Aaron Ventura rated it liked it. I'm no Luther scholar, but based on what I have read, Luther's Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians is the best introduction to Luther's thought you can find. It is not a difficult read by any means; Luther's writing is extremely easy to follow and full of concrete illustrations that make for easy going. The article of justification by faith is central to the commentary, as it is to Galatians itself, and as this is Luther's most important idea, it is a great way to become acquainted with h I'm no Luther scholar, but based on what I have read, Luther's Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians is the best introduction to Luther's thought you can find.

The article of justification by faith is central to the commentary, as it is to Galatians itself, and as this is Luther's most important idea, it is a great way to become acquainted with his understanding of this doctrine -- what it means, what its implications are, and what its Biblical basis is. Throughout, Luther writes in vigorous, vivid prose, using wonderful and homely examples to make his points.

There is no comparison between Luther and any other theologian I can name in the vivid power of their metaphors and illustrations. Who else would create dialogues with "Mr. Law" or refer to the Law as "a bruiser" whom God will not let beat you too long? Throughout, too, you can quickly come to appreciate the relative strengths and weaknesses of Luther as compared to Calvin -- for in the commentary there are points of inconsistency or vagueness that one would never encounter in Calvin, but at the same time, so much more evidence of life and of lively spiritual struggle.

When one reads Luther one comes into close contact with a man, a man wrestling with God; when one reads Calvin, one does not encounter the man, but a mind and a system of ideas and arguments. This is evident even in each author's frequent anti-papal invective. Calvin's arguments are impersonal, whereas Luther's frequently record his own struggles with the papacy and are deeply personal. His denunciation of the monasteries is not based in any kind of careful history or objective consideration of monasticism in its entirety; it is, however, based in his own real experience with a certain form of monasticism.

These are different approaches to theology but in my experience they also shape the kind of worship and spiritual life one encounters within Protestant circles. For all that Reformed theology is based, as Abraham Kuyper argued, on the direct relationship of God with each individual, Reformed thought and practice tends much more toward a cerebral enunciation and affirmation of pure doctrine rather than deep spiritual wrestling and personal relationship with the living God.

For this reason alone Luther is valuable. One does not read Luther's commentary so much for the sake of acquiring expert knowledge about the book, as for the sake of reading Galatians with a partner, with another man with whom one might wrestle with God and with the text. I would recommend that any Protestant read Luther's commentary; it is simply essential for understanding what the Reformation was about. But I also recommend it for non-Protestants, not only to understand the driving force of the Reformation, but for the sake of reading Galatians alongside in the late Richard John Neuhaus's words "the possessed prophet of the utter gratuity of grace.

I got this book for free from Gutenberg, and I was excited to read Luther.

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Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated) Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated)
Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated) Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated)
Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated) Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated)
Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated) Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated)
Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated) Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians by Martin Luther (Illustrated)

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