Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle


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I guess I'll read up on wikipedia and see if there is any continuation, or if the anime ended any better. Mar 25, Ben Truong rated it really liked it Shelves: I was so shocked and dismayed at the ending of the series that I was going to give this tankobon a one or two star rating. However, I knew that this was a visceral gut reaction and those tend to be inaccurate, so I let this tankobon percolate in my mind throughout the day and in the end, I rated this tankobon three and a half stars, rounded up to four stars. I didn't mind that Team Japan came in last — it's to be expected, because South Korea has the best Go players followed by China, so it reali I was so shocked and dismayed at the ending of the series that I was going to give this tankobon a one or two star rating.

I didn't mind that Team Japan came in last — it's to be expected, because South Korea has the best Go players followed by China, so it realistic that Japan comes in last place. What's worse is that he lost that game on the anniversary on the very day that Sai disappeared. Yumi Hotta could have let Shindo win and still have Japan come in last, by having Akira Toya lose his match against his Korean counterpart, which would have been a better ending.

However, she let Toya win and Shindo lose.

I feel that the series end too soon with too many unresolved plot points. No one has achieved the Hand of God, while I had a feeling that it wouldn't be resolved anytime soon, because Sai spent literally a thousand years pursing it and to have Shindo achieve it so young would seem incongruous, so I think that the Hand of God is more of an ethereal goal that every Go player tries to achieve, but probably won't be able to in their lifetimes.

Secondly, Shindo has never beaten Toya in an official match — if they're considered true rivals, no one but them would believe that unless Shindo defeats Toya in an official match. Currently, they are friends disguised as frenemies and it would have been nice for that to at least happen once. Finally, I'm not too sure what to make at the ending with Fujiwara-no-Sai being trapped in a goban once again.

I had thought that when Sai disappeared he went to the afterlife and finally found some peace, but to have him trapped in a goban again seemed like a cruel fate to one of my favorite characters in the series. The other reason I think the series ended too early was because there was so much more story to tell. We have yet see Shindo play in the Leagues, challenge a title, win a title, defend his title, go to the Mind Olympics, and — the story goes on. The problem with Go is that it's a mind sport and as long as your mind is sharp you can still play — well beyond retirement age.

So the question remains, where is the fine line to end the series, when Shindo wins his first title or when he's elderly ready for retirement? I'm not sure where the right line to finish the series, but having it here is too soon. What mollified me a great deal was the second omake at the end. Where we see the 11th Young Lions Tournament through the eyes of two insei: They both idolize Shindo and Toya respectively, but when they play against them in the first round of the Young Lions Tournament, Shoji vs Toya and Oka vs Shindo, they switch allegiances on who's a better Go player.

We end with Shindo playing Toya in the second round of the Young Lions Tournament — with a cliff-hanger no less. All in all, Endgame is a polarizing ending, but above average in exclusion and enjoyment and learn that like in real life there is no end as they continue to play Go. The entire series as a whole was wonderful coming of age story for Shindo Hikaru. For a series centered on an ancient board game, it was filled with drama that kept me entertained and more importantly return for more.

In short, it's a wonderful series to read and well worth the time spent. It's the final volume, and time for the final Hokuto Cup matches. Hikaru finally finishes saying what he was going to say earlier, about why he started playing Go: Akira Toya" Sai and Akira's second game? Akira bites back and surprises Sai, even though Sai wins in the end , and a short manga that takes place after the end of the series, "Shoji! The artwork is beautiful, but I really, really missed Sai.

I think Hotta must have too, or Sai wouldn't have kept appearing in dreams, flashback manga, etc. While this certainly wrapped up the series and gave it a proper ending, I still can't help but feel a bit disappointed. I wanted view spoiler [Hikaru's desire to face off against Ko Yong Ha to actually result in something. I know his loss wasn't the end of the world, or even necessarily his last time facing off against Ko Yong Ha - the series, particularly the final extra chapter, did a good job of showing that the life of a Go pro goes on and there are always more matches to play.

But man, I'm disappointed. And this is certainly the closest any characters have come to guessing, on-page, what really happened to catapult Hikaru into the world of Go. Well, that's that, I'm finally done with this series. Now I kind of want to rewatch the anime I absolutely loved this series. It was awesome from start to finish.

Who would have thought a series about go, of all things, would be so good?

Hikaru no Go, Vol. 21: Great Expectations

But they really managed to portray the games in a way that made them interesting to read about. And of course Obata Takeshi's art is beautiful. It was fun to watch him from from the early volumes to the much more realistic style that he's continued with since then. Jul 09, Alexis rated it it was amazing. Great manga, made me start playing Go This review is for the series as a whole and will include small spoilers.

List of Hikaru no Go chapters - Wikipedia

Anything major will be under a cut, though! This series is one - if not THE - favorite manga of mine. Lovable characters who undergo actual development, a great story and lots of tension I know I'm referring to a boardgame here. Who would have thought? Of course the art also leaves nothing to be desired.

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I can read it over and over again and never get bored. The main protagonist starts out as the typica This review is for the series as a whole and will include small spoilers. The main protagonist starts out as the typical shonen hero. Hikaru is loud, doesn't like learning for school and is not a bit interested in Go. He even has the hair fitting for a main character. Then the character development sets in and you almost wouldn't recognize him anymore if you skipped from the first volume right to the last.

Watching him grow was really one of the most satisfying feelings while reading this story. Obviously he doesn't exist in a vacuum, but I won't list an opinion on all the characters Hikaru meets on his journey cause they're quite a few. I do want to mention that I found it very realistic that he actually outgrows some of his old friendships, leading to some characters to disappear at some point. There are two characters almost, as if not actually just as important as our main character though: Sai no Fujiwara is the first one. I think anyone who plans to read this series knows that Sai is a ghost who teaches Hikaru Go.

He is a fascinating character, cause you realize with time that he's really stagnant. He's lovable and entertaining, but his character is fixed. Development is for the living and watching him realize that is heartbreaking. It also lead to a great portrayal of grief and probably depression after Hikaru realizes what happened. I think it was the right thing to do for the story and it also happened at the perfect time. As much as I love Hikaru, Akira is probably my favorite character.

He is determined, stubborn, disciplined and incredibly talented, but also polite and kind. He's a good person. With a very bad fashion sense - which I love to blame on Hikaru breaking his brain. He's a big part of what drives Hikaru to become better. He's the second pillar in Hikaru's life after Sai. They don't hate each other at all. Their fights are never so serious that the other doesn't show up for the next practice game. They actually want the other to become better. They want to become better together.

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After finishing the story I could actually believe that those two would be in each other's lifes forever. Not because I don't want him to, but because I think it's realistic. It's mentioned by more than one person in the story that they both have equal talent, but one needs to remember that Akira has been playing Go since he was basically a toddler.

He has way more experience and training. I have no doubt that Hikaru will one day in the near future catch up, but this is how it has to be for now. It once again defies the typical shonen series a bit, view spoiler [ where everything gets dragged out forever and then ends with the biggest triumph and adoration for the main character all around. I wasn't unsatisfied at all as I might have been with an open ending if the story had been any different, because I could easily imagine at least five ways of how the story could continue.

And no, I still have no more than a very rudimentary understanding of Go. One doesn't need it to enjoy the story at all! May 18, Hallie rated it it was amazing Shelves: I have read too many negative comments about how the manga ends to let it go, I have to address it.

I think people who are disappointed in the ending, failed to completely realize what the story was. It was not about Hikaru achieving the Divine Move, or surpassing Toya. It was a story about reaching and striving, and about growing up. Sai had to disappear for Hikaru to grow into his own. The real end of the story was when Hikaru and Akira finally faced off and began their relationship as true ri I have read too many negative comments about how the manga ends to let it go, I have to address it.

The real end of the story was when Hikaru and Akira finally faced off and began their relationship as true rivals. I was glad for volumes because they gave me more of a chance to bask in the resolution - what Hikaru was growing into, and how he and Toya's relationship normalized. I could definitely tolerate more, though, don't get me wrong. I think that there were some plotlines being developed in that weren't followed through on, like Yashiro's home struggle, or Hikaru's relationship with his Mom, or what about Akari?

A big one for me that was left unexplored was Koyo Toya's unresolved issue - his need to play Sai? Or was there something else? Where was the author planning to go with that? What is Koyo Toya's future? Another major scene I would have loved to see would be Hikaru revealing his secret to Akira. Then they could have that secret and understanding together, though it's hard to imagine Akira never telling his father about it, and then it starts to get out too much.

I fell in love with everyone - some more than others. But as I read the final volumes, I couldn't help understanding that this was the post-crisis resolution.

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There were only so many more Go games I was going to be able to sit through. Hikaru is on his own path, coming into his own as a Go player, with his friends along the path, fan in hand. That is a fine ending. We had 4 whole volumes of ending - I'd hardly call that abrupt!! Sep 09, David rated it it was amazing Shelves: Wow, I finally finished my Hikaru-no-Go reading marathon. I still find it hard to believe a series like this exists, and that I didn't know about it until just a month ago.

Considering the series title, the latter seems likely, although maybe there's an element of both. Apr 11, Nick rated it really liked it. This ongoing manga about the game of Go is generally fascinating. This was not the best volume of the series, and would make a terrible jumping-on point for a new reader, but was still very interesting. One of the central plots hinged on an odd set of misunderstandings that seemed a bit forced, but the character development still made this a strong volume. Hikaru, the central character, has just qualified for an important tournament that will pit young players from Japan against their peers from This ongoing manga about the game of Go is generally fascinating.

Hikaru, the central character, has just qualified for an important tournament that will pit young players from Japan against their peers from China and Korea. For those not familiar with the game, those are the "big three" nations of the game, and so the matches gain the attention of the press.

One reporter shows up on what may be the wrong day, to interview the Korean team, and the answers he receives, through an emergency substitute translator, seem like a deliberate insult to Japanese Go. This leads to extra stress on Hikaru and the others. The quiet, philosophical side of the story, though, is where it shines, as characters of all ages are shown at different phases of their lives and of the game.

A subplot about a grandmaster of the game who has taken a step back, to look at his life and the game itself, is oddly fascinating. Apr 28, Ben Nealis rated it liked it Shelves: While still a fun read I felt like this book had a severe decline in the story not that the story was bad just that it was almost all filler.

Still an enjoyable read but in my opinion the weakest volume in the series. Sep 09, Ben Nash rated it really liked it Shelves: This story is comfort food for me. I also like that it's a generally positive story about getting good at something. Nov 09, Scott Roberts rated it it was amazing Shelves: The book cover looks nice.

Dec 03, Bob rated it really liked it. I like this series. I look forward to certain matches and enjoy the stories I encounter while waiting for the ones I'm so keen on. Well,I kinda read it in a rush but can't wait for the next one. Oct 14, Peter rated it it was amazing Shelves: Getting close to the end of the series and I enjoyed the return of the characters talking of the quest for the Divine Move. This volume had a good beginning, not the most exciting middle, but nice end.

Hikaru no Go, Vol. 13: First Professional Match

Jan 25, Timothy rated it it was ok Shelves: The art is nice as usual as expected from Obata , but the story and drama is as exciting as a tempest in a teapot, with grudges based on artificial misunderstandings and coincidences. Katie rated it it was amazing Mar 25, Charles rated it it was amazing Apr 03, Mary rated it liked it Dec 07, Alvian Stefanus rated it really liked it Nov 10, Yenlin rated it really liked it Feb 22, David Alex rated it did not like it Nov 07, Hikaru no Go, Vol.

A normal sixth grader who finds himself dealing with a centuries-old ghost and a board game that's even older. Paperback , pages. Hikaru no Go To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Hikaru no Go, Vol. Be the first to ask a question about Hikaru no Go, Vol.

Hikaru no Go - Final Episode's Ending Scene

Lists with This Book. Jan 24, David rated it really liked it Shelves: Now that Hikaru is a professional go player, his first pro game is against And I am knocking a whole star off for the heavy-handed plot device of having Akira's father, Toyo Meijin, have a heart attack just before the game. I mean, are you really going to do this until the last volume, Hotta? Just how many times can you postpone the big grudge matches that the series has been building towards? So, now that the Meijin is in the hospital, he is playin Now that Hikaru is a professional go player, his first pro game is against So, now that the Meijin is in the hospital, he is playing a little Internet go to occupy his time.

Hikaru finds out, and arranges a game with Sai, who has been begging for a chance to play the Meijin again since they first met. After some negotiating, Meijin agrees.


  • Handbook of Chemical Warfare and Terrorism.
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So we actually commence one of those epic battles the series has been building towards: And with the mysterious "Sai" back online, the entire go world ends up watching this online game between the two legendary players. Yeah, everything about this volume was kind of contrived. Still a good story, and the art really carries the "cyberspace" confrontation between two epic figures over a virtual go board, but Hotta needs to find a new angle to the story. You can only spend so many volumes on one or two climactic games.

Speaking of which, this volume ends mid-game. So, next volume has epic potential, but it also has jump-the-shark potential if Hotta pulls another artificial plot device out of a hat to avoid a resolution in the Sai vs. Mar 10, Katrina rated it it was amazing. So I am reviewing this for a number of volumes up to like I just chose this one randomly and I will not say and spoiler's.

First off I started reading this series because I was bored at the time. When I first read it I had no idea Go was an actual game. And began my love of this series and the game. I found so far what I have read to be very entertaining. Overall so fa So I am reviewing this for a number of volumes up to like Overall so far decent series. Sep 02, Hilary rated it really liked it Shelves: Great suspense in this one. Mar 05, Ben Truong rated it really liked it Shelves: The tankobon opens with Hikaru Shindo's Pro Ceremony, where despite reaching equal status within the Go World, Akira Toya refuses to acknowledge Shindo's presence, which enrages Shindo to no end.

Toya's aloofness was not without reason. What Shindo didn't know, what he would find out, was that his very first professional game was with drum rolls Akira Toya! After twelve tankobon and a little over one hundred chapters they're going to play a game! Toya Akira, 2-Dan vs. Hikaru Shindo, 1-Dan in the grunge match of the millennium. The match that would go down in history as the best game ever! Well it might have had Toya shown up. Apparently, just as Toya was about to leave, his father Toya Meijin, collapsed and was rushed to hospital.

Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle
Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle
Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle
Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle
Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle
Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle
Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle Hikaru no Go, Vol. 2: First Battle

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