Life of the Party (Trials of Katrina Book 1)


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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Days of Wine and Tomatoes: Trials of Katrina Novel 3 by Dale J.

Moore Goodreads Author ,. Katrina is back for her third chaotic adventure! Trying to revive a struggling relationship with her detective boyfriend, they're off for a long weekend to wine country along the shores of Lake Erie. Customary to Katrina's exploits, trouble crosses her path like a black cat, altering the idyllic getaway.

As the town of Leamington holds its annual Tomato Fest, the summer wa Katrina is back for her third chaotic adventure! Harrowing, Unapologetic, and Heartbreaking The events described in this book are thought to be true and may account for what took place five days following Hurricane Katrina in Memorial Hospital New Orleans. What happens when a hospital runs out of supplies, oxygen, and resources? How is a twisted lottery system configured to make life and death decisions? Ethical questions abound seek answers in this troubling reconstruction of the events that took place in Memorial Hospital, five days followin Harrowing, Unapologetic, and Heartbreaking The events described in this book are thought to be true and may account for what took place five days following Hurricane Katrina in Memorial Hospital New Orleans.

Ethical questions abound seek answers in this troubling reconstruction of the events that took place in Memorial Hospital, five days following Katrina. This is a highly controversial book and if I don't get all the facts correct, I apologize. There are a myriad of ethical questions that are pondered in this book, i. The focus of this piece surrounds Memorial hospital's doctors and nurses, specifically, those that decided to stay and help or hurt the patients in the evacuation. The focus of the narrative concerned Dr.

Anna Pou, specializing in ENT. The events described within these pages are extremely troubling, if they are in fact non-fiction. Euthanasia was discussed, in addition to how to triage the patients. The sickest patients, were going to be evacuated last. In what cruel and unusual world does that make sense? The events highlighted within these pages are extremely controversial and may or may not have been the absolute truth. A number of rebuttals about the events taken place have been recorded. Some of these include: A link to this story, can be found: There are also some that agree with Sheri Fink.

This article from the Guardian discusses the staff that were accused: Whether you think this book is a work of fiction or not, it is certainly worth a read. I can't imagine being a doctor, faced with such dire circumstances. I don't know if we will ever know the truth about what happened within the walls of Memorial.. I have to believe there were nurses and doctors that acted heroically. And those that didn't will have to answer to their conscience night after night. For an interview with the author of this book, please click here: View all comments. Sep 21, Khosch rated it it was amazing.

I am from the New Orleans area and was one of the many thousands who evacuated for Hurricane Katrina. I was also one of the large population of locals who were offended and dismayed when then-Attorney General Charles Foti arrested a doctor and two nurses who had been at the flooded Memorial hospital during the disaster.

Public opinion at the time was squarely behind the hospital staff, largely because we thought that the opportunistic former sheriff was blaming the very people, who saved so many I am from the New Orleans area and was one of the many thousands who evacuated for Hurricane Katrina. Public opinion at the time was squarely behind the hospital staff, largely because we thought that the opportunistic former sheriff was blaming the very people, who saved so many lives, of not being even more heroic.

This was my opinion, and that of everyone I talked to - until I read the ProPublica article about conditions at Memorial, published in That article convinced me that perhaps something very unsavory had happened at the hospital during the disaster. And so it was with great interest that I read the reporter's more thorough examination of those days in this book. This book deserves a Pulitzer; it is an unbiased, well balanced and extremely thorough examination of the events at Memorial and the consequences of those events.

I also have a Ph. Fink clearly and accurately explained some of the most basic principles of ethics, and how they were or were not applied in this case. The overall impression that I had of the medical professionals at Memorial was that they were so over-taxed, over-worked and under-prepared that they were not in a position to make truly rational choices about their sickest patients.

To prevent this kind of tragedy in the future, our institutions must determine ahead of time how they will react in a disaster, and the people in those institutions need to cling to their moral principles, rather than abandon them in such a moment of crisis. The contrast of Memorial hospital with Charity hospital is most striking in this regard.

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Both hospitals were stranded in flood waters and lost power. But at Charity they were prepared and had practiced for just such an event. They evacuated the sickest patients first, not last, and they didn't give any patients lethal injections. Three people died at Charity, compared with forty-five deaths at Memorial, many of those in the last few hours, even as helicopters were arriving en masse to evacuate the hospital.

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Please read this book. View all 15 comments. Sep 07, Diane rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book is a devastating account of what happened at a hospital in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina hit in Sheri Fink spent years reporting on this story and her writing is strong, filled with grim details and dreadful scenes, but it needed to be told.

After the storm, Memorial Medical Center was flooded and lost power, stranding a large staff and nearly patients, many of whom needed oxygen and ventilators to help them breathe. Due to communication breakdowns, a lack of emergency p This book is a devastating account of what happened at a hospital in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina hit in Due to communication breakdowns, a lack of emergency preparedness, and massive failures from both the hospital's owner and the government, rescue operations were slow and stalled, leading doctors and nurses to prioritize patients into groups of who would be rescued first, or at all.

A realization dawned on Memorial's incident commander, Susan Mulderick, that day. The variability in the sizes of helicopters that were landing and the length of time it was taking to move patients to the helipad left her with one conclusion: Some called it euthanasia, others called it a necessary decision during an extreme disaster. It seemed to [Dr. He had no time to provide what he considered appropriate end-of-life care. He accepted the premise that the patients could not be moved and the staff had to go.

He could not justify hanging a morphine drip and praying it didn't run out after everyone left and before the patient died, following an interval of acute suffering. He could rationalize what he was about to do as merely as abbreviating a normal process of comfort care — cutting corners — but he knew that it was technically a crime. It is a gripping, emotional read, and the situation is horrifying. With no power or running water, conditions worsened inside the hospital -- it was hot and humid, the only light came from flashlights, and there was an overpowering smell of urine and feces because the sewers were overflowing.

The staff described it as a hellish war zone and as a place that no longer seemed like America. There was also a fear of looters and of violence breaking out amidst the chaos, and gunshots were frequently heard outside the hospital. Doctors tried to prevent panic from spreading, both among the patients and among the staff.

It was difficult to read this section without frequently pausing to come up for air, both out of sympathy for those who suffered and frustration for how the hospital and the city could have been better equipped and prepared. The second half of the book, called The Reckoning, focuses on the investigation into the patient deaths. One doctor and two nurses were eventually arrested, but charges were later dropped due to a lack of evidence, overwhelming public and political support for the workers, and criticism of the lack of preparedness and support from the government: Individual decisions at the hospital had occurred in a context of failures of every sort.

Since the storm, government agencies, private organizations and journalists had churned out reports that analyzed and found fault with actions and inaction at nearly every level of every system. Fink compares the situation to what happened after the earthquake in Haiti and when Hurricane Sandy hit New York City. In both cases, health care workers had to make tough choices about who would get access to limited medical resources. Fink's reporting is alarming because it addresses the issue of how many hospitals and other medical facilities have their generators in the basement or on the ground floor, which can become useless in event of flooding.

Similarly, not enough has been done to plan for emergency situations, such as a massive flu outbreak or another natural disaster. It is hard for any of us to know how we would act under such terrible pressure. Who gets priority medical care when resources are limited? What else can be done to plan for disasters? I would highly recommend the book to health care professionals, first responders, those interested in bioethics, and anyone who appreciates excellent reporting. View all 10 comments. Dec 30, LeAnne rated it it was amazing. The facts are all laid out here for you to decide.

Today is the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the storm that ultimately killed more than 1, of my neighbors. It broke my heart to learn what shocking things happened at this very place five years later, but this thorough and intoxicating work of non-fiction puts misery into perspective.

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While drowning and mortal heatstroke killed souls in our community, it was lethal injections that stole the lives trapped in a dark, fetid hospital. Did the kind, caring women who injected the supposedly soon-to-be-dead act as angels of mercy or were they so intent on escape that they put these people to death so that they, the caregivers, could finally board helicopters and escape? At the time, with the coverage on our local news, I did not believe they intentionally murdered people. You'd have to ask me in person what I believe now.

Granted, we were all a bit whacked out psychologically during and after Katrina, and we didnt want to face some of the ugliness that went on. Y'all, this is THE best of all the Katrina books. It describes some of the political and corporate pit falls that lined up, creating giant chasms of chaos. You'll think twice before leaving your sick or elderly loved ones in the care of others when a storm looms.

Getting away with murder is the question at hand: To be frank, I generally hold most "Katrina" books in disdain. Capitalizing on the loss of life, the washing away of belongings and property, the horrible anxiety, and the dispersion of our population bothers me. The only thing worse than dancing on a grave is making money doing it.

That said, this author Sheri Fink wrote instead an expose - an investigative report on not just what happened at Memorial, but tracing the root causes of the failures that ended in horrific deaths. On a personal note, both my children were born at Memorial, and one of them was seriously pre-term - so much so that it is why we spent four months there in the hospital's NICU. One of the doctors who plays a role in the book was my primary care physician during my hospitalization and for years before and after. I knew other "characters" in the story as well and can verify the accuracy with which their personalities and attitudes were portrayed Fink did an outstanding job conveying the confusion, the history, and the red tape that bollixed up not just Memorial, but our entire city.

Before we evacuated, I was tied to the local radio station, WWL, every waking moment and heard our much maligned mayor repeatedly plead people to leave. The Superdome was not supposed to be a storm shelter, but was a last resort site for families of the disabled who might have run out of power for battery-operated respirators. Baptist Memorial Hospital was not supposed to be a shelter either, yet all the coverage that the nation saw on CNN and Fox News about the Superdome could easily parallel what was going on at Memorial.

I did not see any such coverage we lost power in the place we evacuated to but heard live, desperate call-ins on the radio from mothers trapped in attics with their children, the levee breaches flooding their homes so quickly that it was like a tsunami struck, except that the rushing waters rose to two stories high.


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For the few of them who were able to get a cell phone signal, they had to describe the color of their roof tiles and whether there was any gingerbread on their eaves in order for someone, anyone, to possibly get a boat or canoe over to the home to hack them out of the roof. Disc jockies became command center coordinators, asking other listeners to try saving the doomed. I heard the voices of people who likely perished from the water or the baking heat, and their voices haunt me to this day. While had evacuated 90 miles north of the city, some of my friends remained.

We had no power in the 96 degree heat, no running water, and no way out past the trees that trapped us Listening to these trapped citizens call a WWL talk-show to get help was surreal. My point here is that I understand the anguish and desperation probably deeper than most other readers. But I've never been trapped with hundreds of others with no working lavatories, with sick and elderly and the feeble, having to squeeze air into lungs by hand, to ration water, to carry pound patients down 7 flights of stairs, then back up 3 more, to wonder if citizens wading in wanted help or to kill for the drugs in the hospital pharmacy.

Memorial was another level of Dante's hell. This book, Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital , put me there, and though you may not want to be there yourself, I highly recommend it. View all 25 comments. Nov 02, Stephanie Harris rated it it was amazing. What I'm left with is. Conditions at Memorial were terrible, exacerbated by terrible to non-existent planning and very little support from Tenent, the corporate owner of the hospital.

Because of these conditions, staff and doctors were required to make difficult decisions regarding triage and patient care. They were not required to euthanize patients, at least one of whom was alert and required sedation first, at the very time that the evacuation was underway in earnest. I did not become outraged, however, until the DA's office mishandled the grand jury, the medical examiner took it upon himself to disagree with ALL of the several experts he hired to look into the case who all found at least 9 patient deaths to be homicides because he thought it was best for the city, and the medical community at large circled the wagons to protect their own at the expense of the truth.

The icing on the cake is that the doctor, once no-billed, goes around the country grossly distorting the facts and bemoaning the fact that she was almost indicted for making difficult triage decisions, never bothering to mention the sticky issue of homicide, and getting legislation passed virtually immunizing healthcare providers for any decisions they make in disaster situations. I understand that there are lots of gray areas in what happened down there, but the deliberate whitewashing of the facts so that everybody could feel better about healthcare because if you can believe that doctors don't make mistakes, you don't have to worry about a doctor making a mistake on YOU is unconscionable and bad for the world, because it prevents honest assessments about how to handle future crises.

I think this is important reading. View all 7 comments. Jun 14, Emily rated it it was amazing Shelves: Like David Simon's The Wire and Dave Cullen's Columbine, this book is about all of the moral dilemmas that surround massive tragedy, and about the ways that interconnected systems succeed and fail and undermine each other when infrastructure breaks down.

Fink does a remarkable job of remaining, for the most part, neutral -- and yet there are heroes and villains often in the same person and no shortage of drama. Natural disaster, medicine, corporate hierarchies, crime, law, media -- they feed a Like David Simon's The Wire and Dave Cullen's Columbine, this book is about all of the moral dilemmas that surround massive tragedy, and about the ways that interconnected systems succeed and fail and undermine each other when infrastructure breaks down.

Natural disaster, medicine, corporate hierarchies, crime, law, media -- they feed and play off of each other. You ask yourself, "What would I do in such dire circumstances? Was what happened right or wrong? It was hard to read sometimes, but utterly riveting. May 18, Jared rated it it was ok Shelves: I received an advanced copy of this book and was excited to read it.

I've read several other books about Hurricane Katrina and the horrific aftermath and wanted to see what this book could add to the picture. When I first picked it up, I was very engaged from the beginning and couldn't put it down initially. I just couldn't believe what they were going through in that hospital. However, after the first pages or so, it started to drag for me.

It felt like I was reading the same thing over I received an advanced copy of this book and was excited to read it. It felt like I was reading the same thing over and over again. Part of the problem is that I was only able to read the next or so pages in minute sittings, so it was hard to get back into things. Then, after getting through part 1, I started into part 2 and was disappointed that it felt like she retold part 1 all over again as the investigation and court process took place.

Other detractors for me was the length. At pages it is probably too long. I had a hard time with all the people in the book. For a simple mind like mine, there were just WAY too many names to keep track of. Finally, one other candid piece of feedback is that I found the map hard to follow. I must have looked at it a dozen times but could never really make sense of it.

Feb 19, Glenn Sumi rated it really liked it Shelves: Five Days At Memorial is a powerful, balanced and clearly written if slightly dry account of the lives lost — or irrevocably altered — in a New Orleans hospital after Hurricane Katrina hit. Sheri Fink, a physician turned journalist, has obviously done lots of research; the book grew out of a series of articles she wrote for The New York Times Magazine and ProPublica that earned her a Pulitzer Prize.

Initially it's hard to keep track of the dozens of people involved — patients, doctors, nurses a Five Days At Memorial is a powerful, balanced and clearly written if slightly dry account of the lives lost — or irrevocably altered — in a New Orleans hospital after Hurricane Katrina hit. Initially it's hard to keep track of the dozens of people involved — patients, doctors, nurses and administrators, their families. And that's not even counting the police officers, lawyers and politicians who come on the scene after murder charges are laid against a doctor and two nurses.

There's a reason this book took me several months to finish. I kept reading a bit, putting it down, then picking it up again weeks later. After the initial vivid description of those five days and an informative lesson about the hospital's flood history , there's no single gripping story or narrative to command your attention. You'll read about someone, get interested, and then they won't be mentioned again until pages later. Still, it's an often fascinating, informative look at medical ethics and the importance of disaster preparedness.

Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

Some sections are absolutely harrowing. The epilogue, in which Fink investigates how emergency efforts have changed post-Katrina — in New York City, after Superstorm Sandy, and in Haiti, after the earthquake — is revealing. And while reading some sections, it's hard not to think, "What would I do under these circumstances? View all 17 comments. Nov 13, Barbara rated it it was amazing. Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans did not have the resources to adequately care for patients following the flooding and power loss caused by Hurricane Katrina.

In addition, evacuations were slow and difficult and people feared potential violence from looters and desperate citizens. After a few days, the air conditioning failed and temperatures soared, toilet facilities were inadequate and the building reeked, halls and stairways were dark, and the staff was sleep-deprived and exhausted. In Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans did not have the resources to adequately care for patients following the flooding and power loss caused by Hurricane Katrina. In short, conditions were unbearable.

In this book Sheri Fink describes the difficult decisions of several healthcare professionals to over-medicate euthanize a number of patients who they believed would not make it out in time. Afterwards, state authorities initiated a murder investigation with plans to prosecute Dr. Anna Pou, and two nurses - Sheri Landry and Lori Budo - who allegedly administered the fatal injections. There's plenty of blame to go around for the calamity at Memorial, including the hospital's inadequate preparation for disaster, poor government planning and response, chaos and violence in the streets, and the foibles of human nature.

The families of the deceased were angry and wanted justice but many people were outraged at the charges leveled against the women and accused Charles Foti, the Attorney General of Louisiana, of attempting to further his own career at the expense of the healthcare professionals. Sheri Fink does a masterful job of describing the situation at Memorial during the crisis and the legal maneuverings of all parties - prosecution and defense - afterwards. It's hard to say I enjoyed the book since the subject matter was so depressing and horrific - but it was a compelling read.

You can follow my reviews at https: View all 6 comments. Aug 18, Kirstin rated it it was amazing Shelves: It tells the story of what happened in one New Orleans hospital during Hurricaine Katrina, where doctors and other medical staff were accused of euthenizing patients. The book is divided into two sections. The first is an account of what happened in the hospital during the storm. The second recounts the legal process in the years afterward.

Anna Pou, a doctor who was working in the h www. Anna Pou, a doctor who was working in the hospital during Katrina, and later arrested, is a focal character. The author relies on the viewpoints of many different people to tell a necessarily complicated tale, but she has done an excellent job at weaving all the narrative threads together into one compelling story. This is a good book but also a sad book. One of the things that astounded me page after page was the poor planning and communication at almost every level of disaster response. For example, most hospitals in New Orleans including Memorial had food and water stores as well as generators at or below the ground floor below sea level.

Another example was the evacuation issue: The hospital burecrats off location and government officials each assumed the other was responsible for removing hospital patients. Once evacuated, there was no plan in place for which hospitals would take in patients, or how they would get there. And of course no one knew how to prioritize: Even in Memorial hospital, it seems that some basic knowledge and communication could have helped.

The author clearly portrays the medical professionals who were there some of whom chose to stay to care for the sick and dying in a favorable light, as people who did often heroic things under the worst of circumstances. But it seemed that some of the circumstances didn't have to be. I was particularly upset when I read that another building in the Memorial complex had electricity, but on-site administrators chose to hole up there, rather than bringing patients in where climate control and ventilators could've eliminated suffering and saved lives.

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Sadly, we know what happened. The healthier patients and their families left first, leaving the very sick and terminal patients to suffer in the heat, darkness, and increasingly poor sanitation; without access to basic medical care like oxygen. At some point, at least one doctor made the descision to give these patients large doses of morphine and other drugs. Was the intent to alleviate suffering in patients truly believed to be dying?

Or was it, in fact, to cause death in patients that might have lived? A grand jury eventually found Dr. Anna Pou not guilty of murder for her role in administering the drugs. But the bigger issues remain unanswered. What accountability do doctors face in a disaster situation? Who is responsible for crisis response?

What should triage be when resources are limited? And of course, what sort of care is acceptable at the end of life- where is the line between palliative care and euthanasia or assisted suicide?? There are no easy answers, and this author avoids the temptation to provide them. She tells a story, and raises the questions, and then the words stick with you long after the book is over. I received an Advance Reader's Copy for this review.

Covers often change before publication, but I hope this one does not, as the design is eye-catching and extremely fitting. Jun 17, JanB rated it really liked it Shelves: I'm going to start off my review with links to rebuttals, because I think they are important to include. I think anyone accused should be able to tell their side: There was no power, low supplies, a lack of sanitation creating the stench of sewage that filled the halls, oppressive temps that climbed to the s, and there was no h I'm going to start off my review with links to rebuttals, because I think they are important to include.

There was no power, low supplies, a lack of sanitation creating the stench of sewage that filled the halls, oppressive temps that climbed to the s, and there was no hope or relief in sight. The generators, located in the basement, and affected by the rising floodwaters, failed. The lack of emergency preparedness and the lack of support from the corporate owners of the hospital contributed to the feelings of desperation by the staff. Exacerbating the situation were the 7th floor LifeCare patients, the sickest of the sick.

On the third day after the hurricane, the most critical patients, some who were DNR do not resuscitate , were given drugs to ease their pain, and as some alleged, caused their death. Some called it comfort care while others called it euthanasia. The drug combination given was typically used in my experience in hospice care. Were they angels of mercy or angels of death? A physician and two nurses were charged but a grand jury failed to indict. The book raises many questions: The sickest, the dying, or those who have a chance at survival?

At Memorial the corporate decision was made to evacuate the sickest last. As a nurse, this book was difficult to read as I imagined myself working under such appalling conditions. The health care workers performed above and beyond the call of duty in horrendous circumstances. There were many touching stories of heroic acts. Memorial lost 45 patients, more than any other hospital in the area.

But the entire 7th floor was devoted to LifeCare, the sickest of the sick, many of whom were on life support. Kindle Cloud Reader Read instantly in your browser. Eye-poppingly beautiful but woefully shy, when Katrina is hired as a professional guest aka PEST for a company called Life of the Party, her nerves get the best of her. She's saved by a dashing and mysterious stranger who vanishes into the night. Her search and her life are disrupted by the nefarious affairs of her roommates, landlord, and new boss.

Along the way, Katrina learns that she may be shy, but she's certainly no wallflower. Product details File Size: Northern Amusements; 1 edition July 1, Publication Date: July 1, Sold by: Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

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